American and Canadian birds

Stock Photography By Christian Gavin

More than 800 different species of birds can be seen in North America. From passerine and songbirds to Raptors, from ducks to Heron, it doesn't really matter whether you live in Canada or United States, the photographing opportunities are countless. And very often, right out your backyard.

couple of Wood ducks
couple of Wood ducks
#695515
© Christian Gavin
Female northern Cardinal bird
Female northern Cardinal bird
#695516
© Christian Gavin
Canada Goose in flight
Canada Goose in flight
#695517
© Christian Gavin
Great egret landing
Great egret landing
#695634
© Christian Gavin
Barred owl on a tree branch
Barred owl on a tree branch
#695722
© Christian Gavin
Cedar waxwing
Cedar waxwing
#695723
© Christian Gavin
Cooper
Cooper's hawk eating
#695770
© Christian Gavin
Ring-billed gull
Ring-billed gull
#695772
© Christian Gavin
Ring-billed gull landing on snow
Ring-billed gull landing on
#695773
© Christian Gavin
Great Blue Heron reflexion
Great Blue Heron reflexion
#695633
© Christian Gavin
Canada geese in flight
Canada geese in flight
#695771
© Christian Gavin
American Robin on a tree branch
American Robin on a tree branch
#695874
© Christian Gavin
White throated sparrow on a tree branch
White throated sparrow on a
#695878
© Christian Gavin
Blue-headed vireo
Blue-headed vireo
#695966
© Christian Gavin
Black-capped chickadee
Black-capped chickadee
#696019
© Christian Gavin
Mallard female in flight
Mallard female in flight
#695635
© Christian Gavin
Mallard ducklings
Mallard ducklings
#696021
© Christian Gavin
Northern male cardinal
Northern male cardinal
#696022
© Christian Gavin
American Robin singing
American Robin singing
#695875
© Christian Gavin
Juvenile Wood ducks
Juvenile Wood ducks
#696020
© Christian Gavin

 

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Image Details for American and Canadian birds

1. couple of Wood ducks. The Wood duck or Carolina duck is a species found in North America. The male can be identified as the more colorful of the couple. As opposed to the female, that has a more uniform shade of colors.

2. Female northern Cardinal bird. The female Cardinal's distinctive attribute is a lighter redish color. The one on the photo is part of the Cardinalidae group; which is the more common species in Canada, where I had the oppurtinity to photograph this one.

3. Canada Goose in flight. This beautiful Canada goose was coming back from the south, before going further north few weeks later. This bird can travel hundreds of miles without resting.

4. Great egret landing. This magnificient white bird, is one the most impressive and majestic birds I have the opportunity to take photo of. Although the Great Egret is often refers to the Heron, these two are two different birds. The Great Egret should not be mistaken with the White Heron, mostly found in Florida.

5. Barred owl on a tree branch. The barred owl is a large typical owl native to North America. It also goes by many other names, including eight hooter, rain owl, wood owl, and striped owl. It's breeding habitats are dense woods across Canada, the eastern United States, and south to Mexico; in recent years the barred owl has spread to the northwestern United States, having gradually spread farther south in the west. Barred owls may be partly responsible for the recent decline of the northern spotted owl.

6. Cedar waxwing. The cedar waxwing is a member of the family Bombycillidae or waxwing family of passerine birds. It's been named for its wax-like wing tips. Cedar waxwing is a native of North and Central America, and is not considered an endangered species.

7. Cooper's hawk eating. Cooper's hawk is a medium-sized hawk, native to the North American continent. And as in many birds of prey, the male is smaller than the female. These birds capture prey from cover, or while flying quickly, relying almost totally on surprise. As you can see, this one was quite successful with its last hunt. Also, notice the red eye, that appears during the second year of their adulthood.

8. Ring-billed gull. Although their breeding habitat is near lakes, rivers or the coast in Canada and the northern United States. The ring-billed gull is a familiar sight in the shopping mall and parking lots, where it can regularly be found congregating in large numbers. These birds forage in flight or pick up objects while swimming, walking or wading. They also steal food from other birds and frequently scavenge.

9. Ring-billed gull landing on snow. Although their breeding habitat is near lakes, rivers or the coast in Canada and the northern United States. The ring-billed gull is a familiar sight in the shopping mall and parking lots, where it can regularly be found congregating in large numbers. These birds forage in flight or pick up objects while swimming, walking or wading. They also steal food from other birds and frequently scavenge. This gull was pretty eager to see lake melted, so it can find more food.

10. Great Blue Heron reflexion. This great blue heron was quietly resting in the water, when I walked by and took the shot. The great blue heron is a large wading bird, in the heron family Ardeidae. It is the largest North American heron and, among all extant herons. It has head-to-tail length of 91–137 cm (36–54 in), a wingspan of 167–201 cm (66–79 in), a height of 115–138 cm (45–54 in), and a weight of 1.82â

11. Canada geese in flight. Canda goose usually begin to migrate to the south around September, to come back from the south end of March. They usually travel in flock, it is not rare to see more than fifty geese traveling together. Being a bird of large size, and traveling in such number make the Canada goose a no predator bird.

12. American Robin on a tree branch. The American robin is a migratory songbird of the thrush family. The American robin is widely distributed throughout North America, wintering from southern Canada to central Mexico and along the Pacific Coast. The American robin ranks among one of the most abundant, land bird in North America. It is the state bird of Connecticut, Michigan, and Wisconsin.

13. White throated sparrow on a tree branch. The white-throated sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) is a passerine bird of the American sparrow family Emberizidae. There are two adult plumage variations known as the tan-striped, and white-striped forms; the one on this image is of tan morph. The two color morphs occur in approximately equal numbers. Both male and female white-striped birds are more aggressive than tan-striped birds during the breeding season. White-throated sparrows breed in central Canada and New England.

14. Blue-headed vireo. The blue-headed vireo (Vireo solitarius) is a Neotropical migrating song bird found in North and Central America. There are currently two recognized sub-species that belong to the blue-headed vireo. It has a range that extends across Canada and the eastern coast of the United-States, Mexico and some of Central America. It prefers large temperate forests with a mix of evergreen trees and deciduous under growth. Populations of the blue-headed vireo have been steadily increasing since the 1970s[2]

15. Black-capped chickadee. The black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) is a small, nonmigratory, North American song bird, that lives in deciduous forests. It is a passerine bird in the tit family Paridae. The chickadee is well known for its capacity to lower its body temperature during cold winter nights, as well as its good spatial memory to relocate the caches where it stores food. the black-capped chickadee is very similar in appearance to the Carolina chickadee, though a little larger.

16. Mallard female in flight. The plumage of the mallard female, is nothing compared to the males. The male birds (drakes) have a glossy green head, and are grey on wings and belly. While the females have mainly brown-speckled plumage. Mallards live in wetlands, eat water plants and small animals, and are gregarious. Even if the female mallard enjoys the company of humans, this waterfowl can become very protective of their duclings at times.

17. Mallard ducklings. The mallard is a dabbling duck which breeds throughout the temperate and subtropical Americas, Europe, Asia, and North Africa. This duck belongs to the subfamily Anatinae of the waterfowl family Anatidae. The male birds (drakes) have a glossy green head and are grey on wings and belly, while the females have mainly brown-speckled plumage. Mallards live in wetlands, eat water plants and small animals, and are gregarious.

18. Northern male cardinal. The northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) is a North American bird in the genus Cardinalis; it is also known colloquially as common cardinal. The northern cardinal is a mid-sized songbird with a body length of 21 cm (8.3 in). The Northern cardinal has a distinctive crest on the head and a mask on the face which is black in the male and gray in the female. The male is a vibrant red, while the female is a dull red-brown shade.

19. American Robin singing. The American robin is a migratory songbird of the thrush family. The American robin is widely distributed throughout North America, wintering from southern Canada to central Mexico and along the Pacific Coast. The American robin ranks among one of the most abundant, land bird in North America. It is the state bird of Connecticut, Michigan, and Wisconsin.

20. Juvenile Wood ducks. The wood duck or Carolina duck is a species of perching duck found in North America. It is one of the most colorful North American waterfowl. The adult male has distinctive multicolored iridescent plumage and red eyes,with a distinctive white flare down the neck. The female, less colorful, has a white eye-ring and a whitish throat. Both adults have crested heads. Wood ducks are year-round residents in parts of its southern range, but the northern populations migrate south for the winter.

 

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